Captain Kickass Hits New Low In Rasmussen Poll

Get ready for more of the same as the Recovery-Summer-That-Wasn’t winds down and even more Americans start paying attention to his disastrous, failed policies and constant whining about it being the last guy’s fault.

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 23% of the nation’s voters Strongly Approve of the way that Barack Obama is performing his role as president. Forty-seven percent (47%) Strongly Disapprove, giving Obama a Presidential Approval Index rating of -24 (see trends).

The Presidential Approval Index is calculated by subtracting the number who Strongly Disapprove from the number who Strongly Approve. It is updated daily at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update). Updates are also available on Twitter and Facebook.

Overall, 41% of voters say they at least somewhat approve of the president’s performance. Fifty-eight percent (58%) disapprove.

Today’s Approval Index rating is the lowest yet recorded for this president. Overall Job Approval matches the lowest recorded number, and the number who Strongly Disapprove matches the highest yet recorded.

Cracking.

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Sister Sleeveless’ Popularity Slides After Costa Del Sol Jaunt

Michelle Obama’s let them eat cake moment did not sit well with the American people she and her golf-obsessed husband claim to be just like.

After a widely admired start in the White House, first lady Michelle Obama’s popularity is falling and, if the current downward trend in her approval ratings continues, could touch lows not seen since the scandal-tainted days of Hillary Rodham Clinton.

In the new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, 50 percent of those surveyed say they have a positive opinion of Mrs. Obama. That’s down from 64 percent in April 2009 and 55 percent in January of this year. The first lady’s positive rating is barely ahead of her husband’s personal approval figure, which stands at 46 percent in the new poll.

The survey was taken from Aug. 5-9, which happened to coincide with Mrs. Obama’s vacation in Spain, where she, along with daughter Sasha and several friends, stayed in a posh five-star resort. It was a luxurious getaway for the first lady of a nation with nearly 10 percent unemployment and widespread economic anxiety, and it fed an image of extravagance that Mrs. Obama has created by, among other things, patronizing chichi restaurants and wearing $775 boots to break ground at her White House garden. A new name — “Michelle Antoinette” — was born.

The first lady’s falling numbers stand in opposition to the still-strong belief among some Washington political insiders that she will be a big asset for Democrats on the campaign trail this fall. After the Spain trip brought the first extended bad press of her time as first lady, the White House, and some of its allies in the press, pushed back by claiming Mrs. Obama will still be much in demand. News accounts suggested her “sky-high popularity,” her role as “cultural and fashion icon” and her “incredible force” will boost Democrats across the country. Now, with the Wall Street Journal/NBC numbers, that’s not so clear.

Mrs. Obama’s ratings are decidedly different from predecessor Laura Bush. In December 2001, as George W. Bush’s popularity soared after the 9/11 attacks, Mrs. Bush’s positive rating stood at 76 percent in the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. Nearly four years later, in 2005, it was 65 percent. Still later, when President Bush’s job approval rating hit bottom, Mrs. Bush fell briefly to 54 percent — still above where the current first lady is today. 

Poor, misunderstood Michelle will have to lick her wounds for ten days on this humble Martha’s Vineyard estate.

Quinnipiac Poll: Obama’s Approval Drops To Lowest Point Evah

(Photo credit: AP)

Let’s get into the delicious details:

A year after President Barack Obama’s political honeymoon ended, his job approval rating has dropped to a negative 44 – 48 percent, his worst net score ever, and American voters say by a narrow 39 – 36 percent margin that they would vote for an unnamed Republican rather than President Obama in 2012, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released today.

Anti-incumbent sentiment slams both parties as voters disapprove 59 – 31 percent of the job Democrats are doing, and disapprove 59 – 29 percent of Republicans in Congress. But voters say 43 – 38 percent they would vote for a Republican in a generic Congressional race.

This compares to a 48 – 43 percent approval for Obama in a May 26 national poll by the independent Quinnipiac (KWIN-uh-pe-ack) University and a 57 – 33 percent approval last July, just before the political firestorm created by opposition to his health care plan galvanized political opponents and turned independent voters against him.

In this latest survey of more than 2,000 voters, independent voters disapprove of Obama 52 – 38 percent and say 37 – 27 percent they would vote for a Republican contender in 2012.

 

American voters also say 48 – 40 percent Obama does not deserve reelection in 2012.

It’s all Bush’s fault.

 

 
 

Obama’s Numbers Sink To Unprecedented Lows

Unprecedented.

Gallup has Obama’s approval at 49% with 43% disapproving.

Selzer and Company and Rasmussen show a similar downward trend.

President Obama’s approval ratings have hit an all-time low, indicating that the White House faces a tough job as it tries to gather support this week for both a jobs bill and a revised health-care bill.

A new poll from Iowa-based Selzer and Company shows that since November, Obama’s approval rating among Iowa independents dropped sharply from 48 to 38 percent — reaching its lowest level yet.

Similarly, Rasmussen Reports’ latest release of its nightly automated tracking poll yesterday showed that the number of people who “strongly approve” of the president’s performance reached an all-time low of 22 percent, down from a high of 45 at the beginning of his presidency.  At the same time 41 percent “strongly disapprove” of his performance, with remaining voters falling in between.

“Overall the president’s numbers have been between the mid and upper 40s since around Thanksgiving — they tend to get a little lower when health care becomes the primary focus, as it is now,” said Scott Rasmussen, founder of Rasmussen Reports. “The health-care debate has overall captured a lot of people’s frustration … I think people are concerned that the president would like the government to assume an even greater role in the economy than now, and it’s firing up voters.”

Meanwhile, Bam continues to bleed idepependents.   

The new Iowa poll focused how independents feel about Obama.

“This is quite a precipitous drop, there is a loss of confidence — a sense among people that they drank the Kool-Aid, and now there’s a real sense of disappointment,” said Ann Selzer, president of Selzer and Company, which conducted the latest study of Iowa independents.

“His overall job approval rating is at 46 from a high of 68, and has been under 50 percent for some time now. He’d already lost whatever Republican support he had. He is holding onto some Democratic support, there are some people who are still holding out hope, but it’s really the independents who have changed their minds,” continued Selzer. “They’re not tied to any one party, and here in Iowa you are judged not only on what you do but on how what you do is being talked about.”

Otherwise rational thinking people who were swept up in the wave of Hope and Change are coming out of the ether and waking up to reality that they were duped.  You know what emotion almost always follows embarrassment?  Anger.  Not good for Obama.  Not good for Democrats this fall.

Democrats going down in 2010?

I know it’s early, but this is music to my ears.

Politico has the scoop.

Democrats giddy with possibilities only six months ago now confront a perilous 2010 landscape signaled by troublesome signs of President Barack Obama’s political mortality, the plunging popularity of many governors and rising disquiet among many vulnerable House Democrats.

The issue advantage has shifted as well, with Democrats facing the brunt of criticism about the pace of stimulus package spending, anxiety over rising unemployment rates and widespread uneasiness over the twin pillars of Obama’s legislative agenda: his cap-and-trade approach to climate change and the emerging health care bill.

Bolstered by historical trends that work in the GOP’s favor — midterm elections are typically hostile to the party in power — and the prospect of the first election in a decade without former President George W. Bush either on the ballot or in office, Republicans find themselves on the offensive for the first time since 2004.

Massachusetts governor and good pal of Barry O. is trailing Republican Charlie Baker by six points.  The kicker?  Baker is just making his run official today and is a virtual unknown.  Deval blames his dismal numbers on strong leadership.  Now who does that sound like?

Obama’s numbers continue to tank

If anyone wants to know what the rush is on passing health care legislation, look no further than Obama’s slipping poll numbers on the issue – among others.

Heading into a critical period in the debate over health-care reform, public approval of President Obama’s stewardship on the issue has dropped below the 50 percent threshold for the first time, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

Obama’s approval ratings on other front-burner issues, such as the economy and the federal budget deficit, have also slipped over the summer, as rising concern about spending and continuing worries about the economy combine to challenge his administration. Barely more than half approve of the way he is handling unemployment, which now tops 10 percent in 15 states and the District.

As unemployment rises, Obama’s numbers are sure to continue their downward trend which means the window of opportunity for Obamacare to pass is closing – but it’s not shut.  Keep up the pressure.  Melt the phones!

White House 202-456-1414

Congressional Directory

Obama says no to second stimulus

He must have take a long, hard look at his poll numbers while exiled to the hotel room couch Thursday night.

President Barack Obama on Saturday dismissed the idea the nation might need a second stimulus to jolt the economy out of recession and urged Americans to be patient with his economic recovery plan.

Faced with rising unemployment numbers and criticism from Republicans who have already labeled the $787 billion stimulus a failure, Obama used his weekly radio and Internet address to remind voters that reversing job losses takes time.

He criticized Republicans for opposing the stimulus but offering few alternatives to the worst recession since the Great Depression. And he rejected talk of a second stimulus, an idea that has been discussed by Democrats and even famed investor Warren Buffett.

“We must let it work the way it’s supposed to, with the understanding that in any recession, unemployment tends to recover more slowly than other measures of economic activity,” Obama, who is visiting Ghana on Saturday, said in his recorded message.

The stimulus included $288 billion in tax cuts, dramatic increases in Medicaid spending, about $48 billion in highway and bridge construction and billions more to boost energy efficiency, shore up state budgets and improve schools.

The plan “was not designed to work in four months,” Obama said. “It was designed to work over two years.”

Since Obama signed the stimulus into law, the economy has lost more than 2 million jobs and the unemployment rate has climbed higher than the White House predicted it would have ever reached without the stimulus.

Some companies say stimulus money helped avoid layoffs. Independent government auditors found that stimulus aid to states helped keep teachers off unemployment lines. But overall job numbers continue to suffer………..

In the GOP‘s weekly address Saturday, Virginia Rep. Eric Cantor, the House Republican whip, accused the Democratic-controlled Congress of reckless spending and careless borrowing.

Though the Republican stimulus proposal this January had its own deficit-pushing price tag of $478 billion, Cantor and Republicans are trying to make their case against Obama as one of fiscal restraint.

“For the stimulus alone, Washington borrowed nearly $10,000 from every American household,” Cantor said. “Let me ask you: Do you feel $10,000 richer today?”

In his speech, Obama twice referred to “cleaning up the wreckage” of a recession that began on President George W. Bush‘s watch. But with Obama’s poll numbers slipping on economic issues, Republicans want to lay the economy at the president’s feet.

“This is now President Obama’s economy,” Cantor said.

It’s been his economy since he signed the stimulus bill.